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Awhile back I wrote about if your teapot could talk, what kind of things it would say (actually, having several teapots, it turned into quite a chatter session). Since then, I expanded my wonderings into the imaginary “minds” of teapots and what commentaries they would make on their lives as teapots. So, here goes.

Trying to keep those teapots from coming to blows! (Kyusu on left via Yahoo! Images, Little Yellow Teapot on right by A.C. Cargill, all rights reserved)

Trying to keep those teapots from coming to blows! (Kyusu on left via Yahoo! Images, Little Yellow Teapot on right by A.C. Cargill, all rights reserved)

First of all, not all teapots speak English. Some don’t even speak any language known to us humans. They are conversant in “teapot speak” (borrowing a term from George Orwell’s 1984 here – “new speak” was what was left of the language after government officials kept declaring certain words to be non-existent). Some examples of this special form of communicating is “Tooooot TOOOOOT tootle!” (my “teapot speak” is a little rusty, but I think it means “The water’s too hot – you’re cooking, not steeping, those tea leaves!”).

Many teapots are very linguistically talented and, due to spending time around us humans, tend to pick up whatever language we are speaking. In our house, it’s English, French, and a bit of German, with a Spanish phrase or two thrown in for good measure. For our purposes here, I’ll stick to English.

What Teapots Say About Your Choice of Tea

  • “About time you steeped something good in me. That cheap stuff was giving me a migraine.”
  • “A teabag? Really? Why are you even bothering to use me? Just dunk that thing in the tea mug over there. He has no sense of pride, so you can treat him in whatever disrespectful manner you choose.”
  • “What’s all that stuff mixed in with the tea leaves? Looks more like a dehydrated stew mix than something to be steeped in me.”
  • “Whoa, that Earl Grey is really strong. You’d better scrub me out really good after this.”

What Teapots Say About Your Steeping Methodology

  • “Ow, ow, ow, and OUCH!!! That water is too hot!”
  • “Watch those fingernails or you’ll scratch off my gold trim.”
  • “Don’t let those tea leaves stay in me after the steeping is done or the tea liquid will get too strong and bitter and that will make my cranky – and you don’t want to see me when I’m cranky!”
  • “That tea ball infuser is too large and will never fit. And the tea leaves won’t infuse properly. Just dump them in loose.”
  • “Oooooo… hee hee hee… the blooming tea tickles!”

What Teapots Argue About

  • “Handles are supposed to be on the side opposite the spout – not on top or at a 90° angle like many kyusu.” “No way! My handle is at 90° and works just great.” “Oh yeah?” “Yeah!” (They tend not to be the greatest thespians in the world.)
  • “That spout shape is not drip proof. You’re dribbling everywhere.” “A good dribble is fine now and then.” “Only in basketball!” “Oh, droll, so very droll!”

Next time you’re steeping tea, lend an ear to your teapot. It could be trying to tell you something!

See more of A.C. Cargill’s articles here.

© Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this article’s author and/or the blog’s owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

The chawan was in fashion, out of fashion, and is now back in fashion here in the West (Europe and North America). All over the course of a mere three or four centuries. If you’re thinking of buying one or more, there are some things to consider first. Actually, three things top my list of what to look for when buying that chawan.

First, some basic info. A chawan is a small bowl (no handle) used for sipping tea. When tea first came to Europe such small bowls and handleless sipper cups came with it. Tea being enjoyed mainly by the very rich (due to the high cost and risk of bringing the tea to them), they sought a more genteel (and less finger scorching) way of imbibing that wonderful tea liquid. Ceramists in Europe were able to figure out how to attach a handle that would stay cool and attached to the cup all at once. From that point, the chawans and sipper cups were passed over in favor of these new-fangled cups. Today, though, with teas like matcha and the gongfu style of tea steeping gaining in popularity, the chawan is becoming more popular.

To me, the top one is best from a practical basis, but the others are aesthetically pleasing. (From Yahoo! Images)

To me, the top one is best from a practical basis, but the others are aesthetically pleasing. (From Yahoo! Images)

1 Basic shape

Some chawans are too tall and narrow and shaped more like a sipper cup. They need to be shorter and wider. Some are too straight-sided for my taste versus having a more flared out shape. This is not just a matter of appearance but of practicality since the more flared design is better at allowing a slight cooling of the tea liquid so you can enjoy it more fully. Scorching hot tea will burn your tongue and reduce your ability to enjoy its various flavors and aromas. Some of the shape is determined by which tea you will be having in it. A matcha chawan, for example, needs room for that chasen (tea whisk).

2 Good size

No handle. So you’re going to be holding your chawan either cupped in your hand (if it’s cool enough or if you have fingers made of asbestos), with a small cloth under it like in chanoyu, or by the rim which is my usual method. One good reason to have a chawan that is large enough for you to pour enough tea for a good bit of sipping and yet have the liquid low enough so that you can hold it by the rim.

3 Aesthetic qualities

Let’s face it, tea is a sensory experience. The aroma of the dry tea leaves, no matter what form they are in, draws us in. Then of the steeped liquid where the aroma and flavor are closely linked. And the sight of both dry leaves, liquid, and steeped leaves can add to that experience. The teawares are just as important in these respects, a fact that is evident based solely on the endless designs of teapots, teacups, tea boats, and more, that are available. Chawan glazes centuries ago were often dark in color since the lighter tea liquid was supposed to show best against it. I, however, prefer a white interior so that I can see the true liquid color, part of that sensory experience with tea. And luckily today you can find plenty like that.

Happy shopping!

See more of A.C. Cargill’s articles here.

© Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this article’s author and/or the blog’s owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

by Guest Blogger Sarah Rosalind Roberts

Whether you are a frequent tea drinker or a one-a-day type of person, you will undoubtedly have come across unsightly tea staining on the inside of your cup.

A bit of milk in your tea reduces staining. (ETS Image)

A bit of milk in your tea reduces staining. (ETS Image)

This is caused by the tannin found in the tea leaves, leaving behind a brown residue in your mug. It’s a source of anguish for the avid tea drinker, but fear not, it’s nothing to worry about as tannin is a naturally occurring compound.

It’s worth a mention that the longer you brew your tea, the larger the amount of tannin that is produced. If like me living in London you live in areas with hard water, you’ll find this also affects the levels of tannin and consequently staining in your mug.

Regardless of where you live or how you drink your tea, follow these four simple steps to achieve a perfectly, pristine teacup:

1 Prevention

If you live in a hard water area, as mentioned above, invest in a water filter to give you a better quality cup of tea. This will help minimise staining, though it won’t get rid of it completely. Another top tip that helps in hard water areas is to make sure you get rid of the lime scale build up in your kettle – there’s no need for expensive cleaners as a white vinegar and warm water soak will work just fine.

2 Timing

Don’t be lazy! Clean your cup as soon as possible after drinking, allowing as little time as possible for the residue to settle. This small bit of effort will save a lot of effort in the long run.

3 Soaking

If you’re mug is particularly stained, to the extent that you’re questioning whether or not it was always brown on the inside, grab some leftover washing powder or washing tablets. While you’re there throw in your teaspoons as well, as I’m guessing they’re probably tea stained too, and leave to soak in warm water overnight. You’ll be blinded by how sparkly this leaves them!

4 The Old “1, 2″

Lastly, give it the salt ‘n’ vinegar treatment – mix these two ingredients into a paste and rub with a sponge scourer to get rid of those ghastly stains in no time.

It’s amazing that all the tools you need to eliminate tea stained mugs, are likely to be found in your cupboards, so don’t leave it too late!

See also:
Do You Really Need to Clean Tea Stains Out of Your Teapots?
5 Reasons You Should Clean Your Tea Cup or Mug Between Uses

© Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this article’s author and/or the blog’s owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Tea Sub Yellow (screen capture from site)

Tea Sub Yellow (screen capture from site)

When it comes to offbeat Beatles-related merchandise, Beatles hair spray has to rank pretty high on the list. But of course this site is all about tea, and so it’s only fitting that we make reference to a few tea-themed items. There’s a Yellow Submarine tea infuser, for example.

To top that, one well-known tea company came up with a tea they call Beatles’ Blend. Though their web site no longer lists it as being available and doesn’t indicate what it had to do with the Fab Four, another source offers the original description for the blend, “A classic twist on Earl Grey black tea, Beatles Blend black tea hearkens back to the roots of the Beatles’ homeland. We start with traditional Earl Grey, and then add in a rich, malty tea from China, reminiscent of an English Breakfast tea. We balance the blend with an Indian tea that speaks to the Beatles’ avid fascination with and travels to India. Finally, we top it off with a twist of jasmine culminating in a blend destined to become a star.”

To go even one step better than that, a New York-based tea house came up with a special Peace & Love Tea a few years back to commemorate the observance of Ringo Starr’s seventieth birthday (feeling old, Beatles fans?).

To judge by their songs, tea was indeed one of the Beatles favorite drinks. As one might rightly have suspected, given that they were a quartet of British lads, after all. According to Martin Lewis, who claims to be one of the world’s leading Beatles historians, references to tea turned up in more than a dozen Beatles songs, including five that were recorded during one three-month period in 1967 alone.

References to tea in Beatles songs even turned up in the post-Beatles years and one of the most notable of these was Paul McCartney’s (that’s Sir Paul to you) 2005 track, English Tea, which was a tribute to…that’s right. As for John Lennon, some decades after his death his widow wrote in a New York Times piece about his tea prep and drinking habits and discussed the questions they had over whether the tea bags should go in before the hot water or vice versa.

If there is still any doubt that the Beatles were a proper bunch of tea-drinking British lads, then let the photographic evidence on this page be the final word. After all, fifty-plus photos of one or more Beatles drinking tea makes a pretty good case.

See more of William I. Lengeman’s articles here.

© Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this article’s author and/or the blog’s owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Teapots, teacups, sugar/creamer sets, and other teawares can tend to build up in your home. They deserve better than to be shoved into cupboards or stacked haphazardly on shelves. They deserve to be on display where they will add to the ambience. Here are three ways to maximize that quality:

A media shelf unit better suited to teawares. (Photo by A.C. Cargill, all rights reserved)

A media shelf unit better suited to teawares. (Photo by A.C. Cargill, all rights reserved)

1 All together in a special place

My mother had a hutch cabinet. It was a base cabinet with drawers and a separate shelf unit on top. Here she displayed varied and sundry dishes. Many people today use this type of cabinet for their teawares. Depending on which pieces you have and how many, you can probably fit them all on the hutch part so they are neatly displayed, not too jumbled or crowded. One thing to be careful about here is not having the pieces touching so one doesn’t scrape another. Another thing is making sure they are securely in place, especially if you are in earthquake country or live near well-used railroad tracks. You might have to consider a glass-doored display cabinet instead. Another option furniture wise is a media shelf unit. We bought a sizeable one for our various music and movie discs (and VHS tapes since it was that long ago) but found that it was better for our collection of teacups and mugs and smaller teapots.

Mix it up by putting some teapots on a bookshelf along with some books. (stock image)

Mix it up by putting some teapots on a bookshelf along with some books. (stock image)

2 Spread around here and there

Not everyone has a spot in the house or apartment or condo for a large display cabinet or shelf unit. So, some teapots here and a few teacups there are a great idea as long as they are safely perched to avoid hazards such as leaping kitty cats and kids running around, plus those train tracks and earthquakes. Shelves mounted fairly high on the wall come to mind here, but you’ll not have easy access to those teawares. Smaller wall-mounted display shelf units with or without glass doors are another option. If you have bookcases in your house, you can reserve a shelf or two or even put some books in with those teawares.

3 Arranged by themes

Asian, English bone china, transferwares, floral patterns, or various color collections (all robin’s egg blue, for example) are just a few options here. The Asian theme could include a tea boat/table, a tea pet, a bamboo plant or maybe a bonsai, your Asian style teapot (cast iron, Yixing, kyusu, etc.), and even some of your tea implements such as a chasen (whisk for matcha). The English bone china theme can include pictures of British scenes, various icons such as their flag and a statue of Big Ben, along with those teawares. Any subject of interest to you from butterflies to space travel can also serve as a theme here since teapots come in a seemingly endless array of design styles, with more coming daily.

Make your home a delight for yourself and others by displaying those wonderful teawares!

See more of A.C. Cargill’s articles here.

© Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this article’s author and/or the blog’s owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Teapots and teacups aren’t just for steeping tea and drinking it anymore. These days, they serve as garden décor and bird feeders (as seen in this article), but they are also seen as décor items around the house. You can add that certain tea time touch to your house with some of the items I discovered available.

Teapot Lamps

A quick search for teapot lamps turned up screenful after screenful of these items in an array of colors, styles, and configurations that would set your head to spinning. I picked a few eye poppers to show here:

Teapot Lamps from Yahoo! Images

Teapot Lamps from Yahoo! Images

As you can see, the color range is pretty wide. Many also use multiple items, including several teapots stacked and/or teacups and saucers worked in to the arrangement. Most seem to be fairly traditional style lamps where the teapot/cup/saucer are the base, a stem is added for the electrical wire to run up through and connect to the bulb base and switch, and then a lampshade is on top. Some use the teapot itself as the lamp, though, where the bulb is inside. Just like the bird feeders and fountains I talked about in an earlier article, some of these are made of old teapots, etc., while others are designed to look like teapots, etc., but never really were. You’re sure to find one to fit any decorating scheme you fancy and bring that tea touch to whatever room it graces.

Teacup Lamps

Lamps that sport teacups and/or saucers are equally numerous, it seems, and that’s even discounting the ones where a teapot is also involved. Here are some rather amazing ones:

Teacup Lamps from Yahoo! Images

Teacup Lamps from Yahoo! Images

Colors, materials, styles, height, and general arrangements vary widely. Glass, porcelain, ceramic, and metals all come in to play here, just as with the teapot lamps. Whether you want them for your bedside to enjoy while you read before heading off to the land of Nod or on your kitchen table, computer desk, or end tables in the living room to amaze your guests and give you daily delight, they will certainly keep your mood TEAful!

Teacup Chandeliers

Awhile back someone wanting to upgrade their tea room décor asked for ideas. I proposed a teacup chandelier. And it turns out there are ones available in such a variety that again I marvel at human creativity. Here are just a few:

Teapot Chandeliers from Yahoo! Images

Teapot Chandeliers from Yahoo! Images

As you can see, teapots also get into the act here, along with silverware, crystals, and cute mini lampshades. Many of the ones I found seem to be from actual tea rooms and others from homes. They would certainly be great in either and shed a warm glow over your tea time!

Teacup Decorations

Other ideas for using teacups are everywhere. Here are some of the cutest and most clever ones I saw:

Teacup Decorations from Yahoo! Images

Teacup Decorations from Yahoo! Images

I love the teacup candle idea very much. And putting some flowers (even fake ones) in a teacup can be such a mood enhancer. Of course, teacup-shaped cookies will delight your tea time guests (and you, too). Teacup-shaped tree ornaments are great craft items to make and have ready for the next holiday season ahead. Even just displaying those cups and saucers on a shelf (or two or three, depending on the size of your collection) is a good idea

Hopefully, this has gotten your brain juices flowing and the creative sparks to flying. If you want to post a photo on The English Tea Store’s Facebook page of your own tea décor items, please do. We’d all love to see them!

See more of A.C. Cargill’s articles here.

© Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this article’s author and/or the blog’s owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Blueberries N Cream Dome Cozy (ETS Image)

Blueberries N Cream Dome Cozy (ETS Image)

Never trust a man who, when left alone with a tea cosy, does not try it on. (Billy Connolly)

I have never used a tea cosy (or tea cozy, as some apparently refer to it). Which makes sense, because of all of the methods I’ve used for making tea – being a solo tea drinker – I’ve never had the occasion to use a teapot. Hence no need for a tea cosy to keep the pot warm.

I’ve always assumed that tea cosies were kind of a fuddy-duddyish thing, something that hit a peak of popularity in previous centuries and are barely lingering on today. But as I write my monthly columns on tea books I’ve come to realize that this is not necessarily the case. As it turns out there a quite a few books on the art of tea cosies – none of which are particularly fuddy-duddyish – with more coming along all the time.

Based on my unscientific observations of tea cosy books, it appears that Loani Prior is one of the top players in this market. As her bio notes, the self-styled Queen of the Tea Cosies “lives in Queensland, Australia, where her woolly obsessions border on becoming a disorder.”

She kicked off her attempt at total tea book cosy world domination with a tome titled Wild Tea Cosies and then followed that up with Really Wild Tea Cosies. How Tea Cosies Changed the World was next, with a title that might promise just a bit more than the book delivers. And that’s not all. At least one more volume – Pretty Funny Tea Cosies – will roll out in 2014.

The Tea Cosy series of books numbers four volumes so far, as nearly as I can tell. The first two volumes in the series are credited to an entity known as the Guild of Master Craftsman, while the latter two give credit to their authors by name. More about the Guild’s vast array of books, here.

But wait. There’s even more. If you can’t get enough of this sort of thing then you can try Tea Cosies, by Jenny Occleshaw, which came out in 2013. Or you can wait for a 2014 release from another newcomer to the tea cosy book field – Lee Ann Garrett, whose Easy Knitted Tea Cosies is on the way.

See more of William I. Lengeman’s articles here.

© Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this article’s author and/or the blog’s owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

You may be shoveling out from under the latest two or three feet of snowfall, or knocking icicles off the eaves, or huddling around that gas stove in the kitchen to keep warm because your power is still out, but you probably have dreams of Spring, with Summer to follow, going through your head anyway. A nice teapot with a lovely Spring or Summer time design will definitely help those dreams take shape! They’ll also get you planning those warm weather tea parties (and yes, warmer weather will be coming).

Below are four such designs that are so gorgeous with their floral patterns that your hayfever will go into overdrive.

Some wonderful Summertime Designs! (comp using ETS images)

Some wonderful Summertime Designs! (comp using ETS images)

Summertime Flowers Porcelain

A lovely blue, orange, and purple floral design, featuring gold trimming. Sure to bring color and beauty to your tea time. Available as a tea set and separate pieces. You have several options in all:

Summertime Gardens Porcelain

A lovely mauve and yellow floral design, featuring gold trimming. Sure to bring color and beauty to your tea time. Available in a tea set and in a deluxe tea set featuring dessert plates. You have several options in all:

Summertime Roses Porcelain

A lovely pattern of mauve and yellow roses, featuring gold trimming (not recommended for dishwasher or microwave use). It will bring color and beauty to your tea time and sure to be a hit at your next family gathering, holiday, or just because. Available in a porcelain tea set and in a deluxe porcelain tea set featuring dessert plates. You have several options in all:

Summertime Breeze Porcelain

A lovely mauve and red floral and butterfly design, featuring gold trimming (not recommended for dishwasher or microwave use). Sure to bring color and beauty to your tea time. Available in a porcelain tea set and in a deluxe porcelain tea set featuring dessert plates. You have several options in all:

Just think, a flower garden with no weeding needed! Wishing you many great tea party moments ahead.

See more of A.C. Cargill’s articles here.

© Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this article’s author and/or the blog’s owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Nowadays there are nearly a half million patent applications filed every year in the United States alone. That number surely must have been smaller in previous years, but it’s safe to say that there are a whopping number of patents in the files by now. Of these, there are plenty that have to do with tea and at least some of these tend toward the offbeat end of the spectrum. As I’ve demonstrated in my previous articles on offbeat patents, the most recent of which resides here. But there are always more offbeat tea patents in the archive and here are a few.

Tea Mixer Patent Image (screen capture from site)

Tea Mixer Patent Image (screen capture from site)

I’ll start by saying that as much as I like tea and as much as I’m aware that it can be used for things other than drinking, I probably would never have thought of squirting it into my eye. It’s this lack of foresight on my part that explains why I don’t hold a patent for Improvement in Eye-washes, like the New York man who was awarded such a patent in 1873. His eye wash was made of an ominous sounding mix of ingredients that included “sugar of lead, White vitriol, camphor-gum, and alcohol with rain or soft water.” Oh, and green tea. I think I’ll stick with plain old eye drops, thank you.

A few decades later an Englishman living in Canada received a patent for what he called “a new and useful Tea-Mixer.” Which sounds sensible enough on the surface of it, but the curious thing is that the object is described as “a simple, inexpensive, and efficient device adapted to be conveniently operated and capable of rapidly and thoroughly mixing teas, so that black and green tea will be uniformly distributed.” As far as I’m aware, these types of tea are not often mixed and the patent gives no indication why one would want to do so.

If your mind has ever been troubled about what to do with your iced tea spoon after you’ve finished stirring the tea you might not be alone. In 1941, one inventor tackled the problem of what to do about the fuss and mess of such a dire situation by devising a Combined Holder and Drip Collector for Table Utensils. It’s a pretty simply looking device but it looks like it should work.

I don’t think you can patent an egg, since birds first came up with that “invention” a very long time ago. But, as a recent Chinese patent indicates, you can patent a method for preparing a Spiced Preserved Egg that uses a variety of ingredients, including ginger, onion, garlic, cinnamon, and tea. Using tea to flavor and preserve eggs is nothing new, mind you. Check out our previous articles on the topic for more details.

See more of William I. Lengeman’s articles here.

© Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this article’s author and/or the blog’s owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Rocket Infuser (screen capture from site)

Rocket Infuser (screen capture from site)

There’s an app for that, as Apple’s popular trademarked phrase might put it. It seems that nowadays there’s an app for just about everything and tea is hardly an exception. I’ve reported on various tea apps in these gadget reports every now and then. But the good people over at the Apple-focused publication Mac Life have done us all the favor of putting together a list of eight of their favorites.

If you thought that tea was just for drinking, well, that’s just not true. Tea as a flavoring for ice cream is not a totally new notion and it’s one that I’ve written about before. But here’s an article from a Connecticut-based paper about a local company that offers a line of tea-infused ice cream that uses teas like Earl Grey, matcha, and Assam as flavoring agents.

Smearing tea all over yourself might not be one of the first uses you’d think of for tea, even aside from drinking it. I’d still rather drink the stuff, but if you’re interested in white tea, Rooibos or green tea used in a variety of beauty potions take a look at this brief article.

What is it about tea (or wine, for that matter) that causes your mouth to pucker up when you drink it? The term for this is astringency and, as a recent article in Scientific American notes, it’s the tannins in wine and tea that actually cause the astringency. In modest amounts this sort of thing is not so bad and can even be desirable. As the article says, “Their astringency is off-putting to virtually all plant-eaters, from insects to birds to reptiles to humans, though in the right concentrations, they lend pleasant complexity to tea and wine.” More details on how it all works here.

There’s more than one way to skin a cat, as the story goes, and there’s also more than one way to make a cup of tea. One lesser known method is cold-brewing. If you’re in the market for a stylish looking gadget that allows for doing so take a look at the Hario Filter-in-Bottle Cold-Brew Tea Maker. Last of all, because no tea gadget report is truly complete without a novelty tea infuser, here’s a clever one that’s shaped like a rocket.

See more of William I. Lengeman’s articles here.

© Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this article’s author and/or the blog’s owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

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© Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog, 2009-2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Online Stores, Inc., and The English Tea Store Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

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