Scones are thought to have originated in Scotland in the 1500s and today they are popular in every region of Britain. They are a favorite traditional teatime treat. If you have ever attended an afternoon tea, then you were probably served some variety of scone.

Here in the South, scones are often made with self-rising flour and can be quite light and cake like.  In the UK they have a denser texture and are baked plain or with the addition of raisins or currants.  I like to make Scottish style scones with currants.  I pat the dough into large rounds and then cut them into wedges.  For those who like a more convenient method, there are lots of delicious scone mixes such as Ivy Cottage Scone Mix and others.

Most tearooms will serve scones with jam, clotted cream or lemon curd.  Unless you are given an individual portion, you should spoon your serving onto the plate with your scone.  I like mine with cream and homemade lemon curd (which can be made quickly and easily in the microwave).  Once, while visiting La Tea Da Tearoom (now closed) in the  Beaches area of Toronto, I was served some really delicious scones.  They were so good that I asked the owner for her secret.  She told me that she always used the recipe from the book “Taking Tea At The Savoy”.   Also, the butter she used was at room temperature, rather than ice-cold as usually recommended.

As for how to eat the scone, you should break off a bite sized piece and spread it with cream, lemon curd or jam. Place your butter knife on the right side of your plate between bites. Keep in mind that it would be impolite to dunk the scone in your tea. However, teatime etiquette aside, the point is to relax and enjoy your tea and scones.

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